Capture a Range of Student Responses using Formative Assessment

Capture a Range of Student Responses using Formative Assessment


Welcome back to the module on Gathering Evidence
of Student Learning. Recall that the four main ideas of this module
are: Think of “Evidence” Broadly Gather Evidence Aligned to Learning Goals
and Success Criteria Capture a Range of Student Responses Plan and Strategically Position Evidence-Gathering
Opportunities This particular video is focused on the third
idea, Capture a Range of Student Responses. Teachers know that students learn according
to their own, unique rhythm, which can change over time and from lesson to lesson. Sometimes learning moves in a regular, steady
progression; other times, it seems to germinate for a long time before it’s suddenly visible. This is an important consideration in designing
or selecting instructional activities and evidence-gathering strategies. Because all students will likely not be at
the same place relative to lesson Learning Goals and Success Criteria, different students
may need different kinds of opportunities to demonstrate precisely where they are. Teachers can plan for differentiating evidence
gathering strategies by keeping in mind two important considerations. The first is the common misconceptions students
may have about the lesson’s learning. Teachers who are familiar with their content
and who have taught it before have a sense of where the hotspots in a lesson might be
and where and what challenges, difficulties or possible misconception are likely to occur
in the learning sequence. They intentionally plan to gather evidence
related to these hotspots to make sure that students do not get stuck or persist with
a misconception. The second consideration is anticipation of
student responses. An integral part of gathering and analyzing
evidence is being able to lay out how student understanding and/or skill is likely to develop
over the course of the lesson, how students will progress from where they currently are
to achieving the lesson learning goals and success criteria. It can be helpful to think of this progression
in three levels: emerging, maturing, and consolidated. The earliest learning is the emerging level.
New learning is just beginning to take hold. The learning is not well formed yet, but is
the basis of which teachers and students can continue to build. Teachers can ask, what does the emerging level
look like for this lesson? Next is the maturing level. This is well beyond the emerging level, but
students do not have a complete grasp of what they are learning yet and still need some
prompting or scaffolding to meet the learning goal. What does this level look like for the lesson
goal? At the consolidated level, students show they
have a complete grasp of the concept or the skill. They will be able to use this new learning
independently. While this progression occurs at different
rates for different students, these three basic categories describe the progression
you think your students will take en route to achieving your Learning Goal. Now we’ll take a look at an example from
a language classroom. In this example, students are learning how
to negotiate as they work in teams to plan and build “grocery stores”  for their
classroom. These tasks take a significant amount of discussion
during which students need to use words such as “would” ”could” and “should”
in order to propose a plan and persuade their teammates of their ideas. Within this context, students learn how to
justify ideas and agree and disagree politely. The teacher will gather evidence of learning
by observing students and asking them to share what went well and what were any challenges. Here is a table to show the learning goals,
success criteria, and activity together. Pause the video a moment to look at this in
more detail. Based on this context, here are anticipated
responses for emerging, maturing and consolidated understandings. At the emerging level, students express ideas
more frequently as demands than conditional statements, pose disagreements as personal
likes and dislikes, and rarely ask each other questions. At the maturing level, students have begun
to use more conditional statements to express possibility, seek common understandings through
questions, and can disagree more diplomatically. At the consolidated level, students do not
make statements of demand, they use a variety of vocabulary and phrases to express possibility. They also ask frequent questions to create common understanding and advance group ideas. At this level, students also provide justification as they agree or disagree to explain their opinion This lesson can be extended by students engaging in further discussion around food sources, such as comparing the utilization of grocery stores verses utilizing traditional food gathering techniques.​ As you can see, when you have your performance expectations defined before the lesson, knowing what evidence to gather is more straightforward. You are also set up to easily analyze the
evidence. From this, you will know where students are
in their learning and be able to define next steps. Next, we’ll pause and reflect. You’ve now completed the suite of videos
for Gathering Evidence. Please answer the following exit questions to wrap up this module.​
​ Why is evidence gathering an important part
of the formative assessment process?​ How does evidence gathering occur in your
classroom? ​ In what ways can you improve evidence gathering
in your classroom? Think of a Learning Goal from a recent lesson.
What does emerging learning look like for it? Maturing learning? Consolidated Learning? What evidence-gathering strategy did (or could)
you use to capture the range of responses you described above? Thank you. You have completed the module on
Gathering Evidence of Student Learning. This video draws on training modules created
by CRESST for the Colorado Department of Education. We thank the Colorado Department of Education
(CDE) for enabling us to share this work. We are also grateful to the following individuals
for their contributions to these modules: Brenda (Paddlety) Sullivan, David Sullivan,
Anjanette Williston, and Angela Landrum.

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