NCBI Minute: Tailor Your PubMed Search Experience with My NCBI

NCBI Minute: Tailor Your PubMed Search Experience with My NCBI


Hello, and thank you for joining us for this
NCBI Minute. My name is Sherri Holland Bailey from NCBI
customer services. We will learn how to Tailor Your PubMed search
experience using My NCBI. We begin by highlighting search terms making
it easier to scan results, customize search filters to narrow results, and conclude by
permanently displaying up to 200 records per page. Let’s get started with highlighting. For today’s example I am using my free, newly
created NCBI account that can be accessed directly from PubMed. If you are already logged into your NCBI account,
you can return to the My NCBI home page by clicking on the My NCBI link located beside
your username on the top right. You may wish to access your NCBI account directly
with the following URL (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/account). Now that I am logged in to my My NCBI homepage,
I will click the NCBI site preferences beneath the blue toolbar and to the right. Beneath common preferences, click highlighting
and a pop-up window will allow you to select your favorite highlighting color. Click save. A confirmation of changes can be seen both
here and here. Let’s return to PubMed where I have created
a search for asthma. Notice the term asthma is highlighted in number
four because it appears in the title. Although my search term does not appear in
1, 2 or 3, my term does appear in keywords and multiple times in the abstract. This allows me to quickly scan and determine
if this article could fit my research needs. Let’s set our filters. Filters assist in narrowing down search results
to smaller groups of data in the NCBI databases. For example, I am doing extensive research
for the most recent publication dealing with adolescent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
or COPD. I use filters to sort through the thousands
of citations in PubMed to target at the most relevant results for my research. A quick word about filters. You are allowed to use the maximum of 15 filters
within PubMed. To get started, you may wish to select from
aCtegory and your choices include: Popular, which is most common; LinkOut, which groups
resources provided by outside organizations; Properties, which groups records according
to specific criteria such as age, human or animal and male or female; and finally, Links,
which links to other NCBI databases. At your convenience, I encourage you to fully
explore the predefined PubMed filters. For the second time, I have selected a few
filters from Categories. Once selected, the filters will appear in
your PubMed filtered list column. Any filter you wish to be active requires
you to be logged into your NCBI account and will be active as long as the box is checked. I’m interested in adolescent COPD. Although standard filters are useful they
do not always capture every filtering need. This is a job for custom filters. Once you click Create Custom filter a pop-up
window will appear. Here is where you will enter the term or terms
to create the customized filter. In my example, I entered terms that will locate
items referring to COPD, adolescents published in the year 2017. You may have noticed the bracketed DP. DP is a PubMed search field description tag. For those new to description tag or need a
refresher, a great tutorial is linked at the bottom of the screen. (www.nlm.nih.gov/bsd/disted/pubmedtutorial/020_710.html). You will also be able to find it in additional
materials posted at the end of this presentation. Next I will test my query. Based on the initial results, I may decide
to further broaden or narrow it. Now it is time to create a name for the filter. I have taken the guesswork out of what a filter
does by naming it COPD Adolescent 2017. Once complete, click on save filter. Custom filters will not automatically be active. They must be selected. Custom filters may be removed by clicking
the delete link. Predefined filters may be removed by unchecking
the appropriate box in the Active column. You may also edit custom filters at any time
by clicking the gear, modifying your query, and clicking save filter. Now that I have all of my filters in place,
let’s take a look at how it appears in PubMed. Notice I still have my search term asthma. Customized filters are on the right. In the parentheses, total number of items
available is shown based on my search of asthma, which is seen in All. If I’m interested in only Free full text,
I will click the corresponding link. Notice, you can quickly manage your filters
by clicking on the manage filters link which will re-direct you to the filters page in
My NCBI. Now that we have created filters, we are also
able to quickly activate, deactivate, modify and manage filters from the My NCBI homepage
without the extra step of My NCBI site preferences. A quick recap. So far we have learned how to highlight search
terms, create, modify, activate and use filters. And now we will learn to permanently display
up to 200 records in a PubMed page. Once you click Results Display Settings, a
pop-up window will appear. Select the desired number of results per page
and click save. Now that the results have been saved, let’s
see it in action. I can verify the amount of items per page
in two places. Beneath search results and beside per page. You may also temporarily change the default
by using the drop-down box next to per page. These are just a few of the ways to tailor
your PubMed experience. Thank you for joining us and please feel free
to ask any remaining questions at this time. Thank you. I don’t see any questions that we haven’t
already answered in the chat pod. Let’s go on to the next slide, which has the
help document links on it. Here is a slide that has more information
and URLs that will give you more help using PubMed search field tags and other things
about My NCBI. Check out our blog at, ncbiinsights.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov,
and make sure you check out our YouTube channel. Remember that you can write to us at the helpdesk,
[email protected] Thanks everybody for coming and we will see
you next time.

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