Video Production Equipment Basics [Video Island Podcast]

Video Production Equipment Basics [Video Island Podcast]


Hi, I’m Blake Smith.And I’m Matt K.And we are the Video Island Podcast,where we talk all things video production.That’s right.And in this episode, we’re gonna be talking about what video equipment is worth your time. And really depends on whether you’re a beginner, intermediate or professional. So let’s jump right in. (upbeat music)So on today’s episode, we’re gonna be talking aboutwhat video equipment is worth your time. It’s a very, very broad subject.Yeah.It really is.As video is very vast, video equipment, video production, just in the realms of doing stuff personally, whether you’re vlogging, doing traveling stuff, or if you’re producing video for business, whether you’re the sole video producer at said company, or you’re on the content team, you have no video experience, and then your boss comes in, you’re like hey, I’ve been seeing this thing is kind of been blowing up, I’m sure you know, it’s called video.Yeah, well that’s writing a little bit more video.It kind of puts you on the spot of like,okay, where do I start, what do I do?Yeah.So it can be pretty overwhelmingfor the people who don’t know, one thing about video production, but at the same time for people who do have an understanding, it’s nice to know what’s out there. especially, keeping budget in mind, and just all the other variables in play when it comes to, not only cost but picture quality and resolution versus stabilization.And all the fun features.Exactly, so I think we wanna really kind ofbase this episode around kind of beginner, intermediate and advance.Yeah, more or less, yeah.On both knowledge and hardware.Sure.Because I think that really, both beginner,intermediate and advanced knowledge, really comes into play on where you should kind of gauge where you sit when, picking up hardware, from a beginner, intermediate and advanced standpoint. There’s no point being having no knowledge, in the realm of video production. And yet, you’re dropping $10,000 on camera, light kit and microphone, when you don’t even know how to use it. I’ve seen a bunch of videos in regards to photography, give a professional photographer like bottom line, DSLR entry, exactly entry level camera. And give a beginner the best camera, like top of the line DSLR, $10,000 DSLR and see who does better. And who does better?The professional, the ones that knows the principlesand the backgrounds, they are gonna be the most successfulSo, yeah, so I think, just as I kind of being,setting the stage for today’s episode on the conversation, let’s kind of dive into the first, the first step being–The first tier.The first tier yes,being the beginner.
Sure.So, obviously being a beginner from both experienceand hardware side of things. For these from experience side of things, you don’t know anything. So all you really wanna be able to do is, point something and record a video. And your basic knowledge of that is, point and click record.And you take a–And Bob’s your uncle.What’s than slight step up from that more or less.So from a hardware side of things,from audio, lighting, camera, where do you think is the good point to start?Yeah, for sure.So, particularly if you’re an individual just starting out, whether it’s for your own personal use, or for a business, I think it’s kind of the same thing, a good starting point is working with equipment that’s going to kind of be perhaps limiting, but it’s better off that you will learn the principles behind how to use these pieces of equipment, and then find out on your own that you’re limited by the equipment, so then you can then appropriately invest in the next step up. And we’ll talk about that next step up in a bit. So for me, when you’re just starting out, say you’re doing a vlog, or you want to just generally produce content for YouTube, or your own YouTube channel, maybe you’re a professional within your field, and you wanna share some of that knowledge on your own channel. But you’re kind of intimidated or not sure what to kind of start out with, in terms of having video equipment and gear. Well, a good starting point really could be something as simple as your cell phone in your pocket. The cell phones that we have today, particularly as long as it’s within the last few years, in terms of its age, is gonna be a pretty rock solid device in terms of starting out, and for quality sake, and just ease of use. So I’d say, whether you have an Android or an iPhone, those are the kind of the big two players in the game now, so either one shoots, often a 1080p resolution, which is kind of the industry standard in terms of resolution.A lot of them now shoot 4k.And a lot of them now shoot 4k.So right there, you’re having what is going to be, the next industry standard, being 4k, built into your camera, so you have both options there. The very least if you’re shooting at 1080p, you have met the industry standard in terms of resolution and most people have a 1080p TV at home, if you don’t have a 4k TV at home, 1080p is just kind of across the board what you’re gonna be wanting to record at. But these cell phones do a really good job in terms of giving you the ability to kind of be flexible and mobile and not be weighed down by too much gear. And not be too scary, because there’s only so many functions of formats within these cameras. So if you’re looking to do vlogs, and things like that, they’re a great option for that. They’re a fairly wide angle lens, so they are fairly limited in terms of working with, if you don’t wanna be on such a wide angle shot. What you’ll find is that, the lens is very wide, so it’s gonna be wanting, it’s gonna be happiest when it’s getting the landscape shots of things. So wide broad shots. It’s going to obviously, and you’ll probably notice people that use entry level cameras or their cell phones, when they point the camera at their self, and they’re vlogging at an arm’s reach, it’s fairly wide and slightly distorted looking just mildly, in a lot of cases, but it’s still fairly distorted. And what the distortion is is when you get to a certain amount of width within your focal range, you start to almost, you begin that fish eye effect, where things start to bend a little bit within the frame. And that’s the last thing you want, particularly for getting an individual on camera, because it’s not, well, for one it’s not slimming, but it’s also distorting how somebody looks. So ideal is that you have an iPhone or an Android that has the double lens feature, so you can use the slightly more zoomed in lens for getting an individual or yourself on camera. But if you don’t have that option, it’s just one single wide angle lens, you can buy pretty cheap on Amazon or other strange, maybe less trustworthy sites, a series of clip on lenses, that are some are wide and some are closer, they’re not the best ever, but they are funky to experiment with, that can maybe help zoom in your fixed blends on your camera. That’s just the image though. So you can record a video on your phone, you can export that video out of your phone onto your computer if you want, or edit it directly on your phone. If you wanna fire something up to YouTube or whatever pretty quick. But you’re missing some other elements in the game, one being better quality audio. So there’s something to say for having a decent quality image in your video. But it’s not the end of the world, if it’s not the best image obviously ever, there’s a lot of content, I’m sure we’ve all watched a lot of content that isn’t the most stellar, but it’s still good quality content, because the subject matter’s interesting, and it keeps us engaged. What’s gonna also keep a viewer engaged and the listener engaged is decent audio. So if you’re a vlogger, or if you’re doing videos, and maybe you’re at a conference or a noisy environment, or you’re outside, the last thing you want is to be recording at arm’s length away from your phone, for example, and picking up a lot of the ambient sound that’s in that space. So say you’re outside, you’re getting the rustling of trees, or just the wind outside, or if you’re in a space indoors, maybe you’re at a mall, maybe you’re at a conference, or maybe you’re at some kind of convention or something cool like that, you’re gonna be getting a lot of buzz of people, moving, background sound, all that kind of stuff. There’s a lot of impedance when you start to remove the audio away from the person speaking, further and further and further and further. So what you really wanna do though in those circumstances, is have a microphone that’s close to your source here, your person talking. So I highly encourage looking at something like, there’s a wired lapel or livelier mic they’re called, we have them on right now, and that’s what’s attached to us. Is a Rode smartLav, or that’s the name of it right? A Rode smartLav. And what it is, a Rode is the company, R-O-D-E, I believe they’re based out of Australia, but they ship worldwide, for about $100 or $50, $100, somewhere around there. You get a microphone that plugs into your smartphone, and you clip it onto your chest, so your chest is the best place to put a microphone on your body because it has lots of resonance from your chest and in your diaphragm. And a lot of bass which sounds really nice and pleasing to the ear, but it’s also out of the way of your direct your mouth, and all the air coming out of your body. So what happens if you say a lot of P’s or T’s, those P’s tend to pop. And if you ever microphone right in front of your mouth, it’s gonna cause the microphone to pop and pop, you’re gonna hear that boom, boom sound every time you do it. By all means take whatever microphone you have, and speak right into and go pa-pa, you’ll hear it like the air puff, and it’s kind of disturbing. So for not a lot of investment, you can get a really good quality microphone, that you clip on your body, or onto somebody else, if you’re doing interviews with somebody on your smartphone. And it’s gonna sound a lot better than being far away from your subject, trying to record audio through your phone for example. That’s, to me, that’s the worst case scenario, is that you have to use the microphone that comes on your camera, whether it’s a cell phone camera, or a more professional or like consumer even level, entry level camera, all those digital SLR bodies that shoot video have an internal microphone. That’s kind of like worst case scenario, don’t wanna ideally use that, it’s kind of there just as backup the most, the best case scenario is that you have the microphone on the person. ‘Cause it’s gonna sound the best, it’s focused on them. So I would say that’s a big factor for starting out when you’re using maybe a cell phone. You could also use other things too. So there’s like DJI, which is the popular drone company, they make the flying drones, the video drones. They also have a little mini motorized gimbal, with the camera attached on it called the Osmo Pocket. It just more recently came out. It’s unbelievable, shoots at 1080p, it shoots at 4k resolution, and the image quality is actually really impressive for a lens that’s like smaller than my pinky thumbnail or my pinky nail. Yeah, it’s really small. But the image quality out of it is pretty amazing. And the benefit of having that gimbal, particularly if you’re into vlog, vlogging or you’re doing convention stuff, anything like that or travel,Anything on the go.Yeah, on the go is that this motorized gimbal bounces outand stabilizes your shot. That’s another factor is that the last thing you kinda want is to be hand holding your camera, and have shaky footage, because it does get kind of hard to look at. So if you can eliminate that by having something that balances out that emotion, like a cheap tripod, or one of these DJI Osmo Pockets, that just totally butter smooth out the motion, so you can go and run with the thing, and get yourself on camera, get something else on camera. It’s awesome. Like that takes you up to like a really good quality level, for not a very (mumbles), I believe one of those DJI Osmos are like, 450 or $500 U.S., it’s not bad at all.500 Canadian.500 Canadian, so yeah.So even better if you’re in the U.S. So, that’s pretty cheap for an investment particularly if you’re interested in video, which I’m assuming you are, ’cause you’re listening to this, by watching us. So yeah, I think that’s a big factor.So with you touching on the whole gimbaland stabilization aspect of it.Yeah.Maybe touch on, ’cause we talked about the camera,and I mean you talked about, using using a wired lav, and then you segued into the gimbal being a camera, but then you touched on the whole gimbal part of things. So obviously the gimbal being stabilization and what not, and stable footage goes a long way,For sure.In comparison to shooting handheld.Yep, understand.Is there anything that you would suggestin the instance of, yes, there’s a gimbal, but maybe in the form of a tripod,Yeah, for sure.So you can get really cheap tripods off of eBay or Amazon, I think even like Amazon sells like an Amazon, Amazon Basic, branded tripod for probably like 20 or $40 U.S. which is like nothing. It’s not gonna be anything too fancy, but it’s gonna be able with it, particularly, again, if you’re using GoPro or your smartphone, you can easily get a mount for that smartphone device or GoPro, to put on top of this tripod and attach to it. And then you have a tripod, so you’re ready to rock, you’re like that much closer to being a pro, because you have your own personal tripod. And again, the more you can avoid that shaky footage, added by really good in-camera stabilization, which is more and more expensive. Or just having a tripod or gimbal around, those are your best options. A tripod obvious is gonna be your best option if you’re not moving. So if you don’t wanna be hanging on to your camera all the time, and stabilizing it like that, put it on a tripod, you can step away, make sure you have a good audio source on you so you’re not gonna sound like garbage, ’cause you’re too far away, it’s gonna be your best case scenario.Especially I guess in the situationwhen you’re shooting by yourself, because even with mobile devices, even with the Osmo.Yes.We talk about the Osmo just because we havean Osmo Pocket of our own.Yeah, there’s other brands,but that one has to be industry’s leading right now.Yes, so the mobile device and even the Osmo Pocket,they have facial recognition, so in this situation, whether you’re recording yourself, or recording a subject and you’re being the person behind the camera, it does help keep your focus on that subject based off of the auto face recognition.Yeah and you don’t fall out of focus.Yeah, so in the instance of the tripod,before we jump up to our next level, intermediate level, when you’re on the go, tripods can be pretty big and bulky. I just wanna talk about, there’s this other thing which a bunch, I’m sure a bunch of people have seen.The GorillaPod.The vloggers using all the time.There’s been other approaches, there’s one on Kickstarter that I actually saw Peter McKinnon review recently.Yeah.It’s pretty cool, it’s not as,I don’t know, the pros and cons, both the GoillaPod and this, I can’t remember what it’s called. They both have the pros and cons, but anyways, maybe kind of talk about, what are the pros of using a GorillaPod.Yeah, so a GorillaPod is, I believe it’s a branded name.But yeah, effectively what it is is that it looks kind of like a tripod, with a bunch of little balls on it. And all those balls are motion points and bending points on the tripod. So not only can you have it, they’re generally fairly small, they’re not much larger than kind of elbow to wrist size, at their largest size, but good for putting on the table or a countertop, if you need, and then you can put a camera on top of that, for like a quick and very portable option, easily fits in a carry on bag or suitcase or in a backpack, anything like that. But not only that is, but it also is very good for, if you need to like turn those legs in, ’cause like I said it has all those articulating parts of the limbs, ’cause they’re all on balls that move in swaying swivel, that you can attach it to like a tree limb if you want to. If you’re outside vlogging, you need to attach it while you’re on the go. Or if you’re, whatever is around you, you clamp it onto things, essentially. So I imagine the GorillaPod name comes somewhere in, from the idea of like it being something that just grips onto things. So like a monkey, it just kinda,Or a gorilla.You grip it on,or a gorilla, you grip it on, gorilla just seems like big and clunky and kind of oafie. I know they’re super strong, so maybe that’s a part of it. But like, I don’t know, just like the idea of like it grips on to whatever you want to put it on. Which is a really cool option. So it’s a very versatile tool for stabilizing your camera.Now that I just try to, side note,do you think it’s just kind called a gorilla because it’s more of kind of like, on the go like–I think it’s multifaceted name really.So like it’s gorilla, so like just the gorilla style video producer, which is very just run and gun is another name for it, they’re very independent and kind of scrappy, so that gorilla style of shooting video is kind of like sexy to people, ’cause it’s like, I don’t need all the fancy gear. But you know what, that’s a great way to kind of start off, because you’re not too worried about necessarily having the highest quality, best gear, because as we said off the top, having all that good stuff, if you don’t know how to use, it doesn’t mean anything. You just wasted a lot of money. It’s having a great idea in your head, that’s gonna make the video what it is, that’s where the quality is really gonna lie.Yeah.So, yeah, so that’s your enter, your beginner level stuff. Now let’s dive into the intermediate stuff. Let’s, I’m just gonna throw it out there that my opinion, and I’m sure you agree like the Osmo Pocket, talking about gimbals and stuff. I think that kind of blurs the line between beginner and intermediate,Probably a little bit.Just because…Of the investment?Not even the investment, just what the gimbal does,and actually what you’re getting out of it.I guess, yeah.When you get out of a gimbal,especially with the Osmo Pocket, you got a gimbal that shoots 4k.Yeah.You’re starting and to look at footagethat actually looks pretty professional.Pretty darn professional, yeah.So that being said,let’s dive into the intermediate level. You know more than just pointing and pressing record, you have an understanding of sharp composition, you wanna make sure that your shots are steady, they’re not, you’re not shooting handheld, and it’s all shaky and what not. You wanna make sure that your subject is completely in focus, has–Good lighting on them.Decent lighting and whatnot.Yeah, so that being said, let’s dive right in.Sure.Let’s kind of follow that same order.Let’s dive into the camera.Sure, I’m sure a lot of peopleprobably fall into this category. This is probably the most meaty category in terms of people that are interested because there’s probably a lot of people that honestly probably feel like they have the ability to spend probably around 1500 bucks-ish, 2,000 bucks maybe, to throw at something that they’re really interested in. That’s kind of like the hobby investment when it comes to video production is that price point more or less. So whether you’re interested in doing vlogs or personal video or you’re even a business that, like you said, now wants to take that milder but next step up, but have decent longevity with the gear. You can be looking at cameras around probably the hundred dollar thousand dollar mark from Canon, Olympus, Nikon, they all make the–
Sony.Sony, they all make these entry level camerasthat are stills camera, so a digital SLR. So there’s also some muralist options, that’s a whole another story. You can Google DSLR versus mirrorless cameras. Effectively, they do the same thing with slightly different mechanics. So they’re primarily stills, photo cameras that have a video feature built in, which is kind of cool, because not only are you getting just like a really solid photo camera but you’re getting this video camera on top of it. So you get the best of both worlds, so it really makes it a more flexible option. So with these, we, I can speak to Canon because that’s what we invested in, when we’re particularly when we’re starting out. And even at where we work now, we started off with some more humble gear that was, the entry level items and digital SLRs from Canon.Canon T2i.Yeah Canon T2i back in the day.So that was a big game changer in terms of the world of video. Particularly for people interested in getting into it. Because it gave you 1080p video, which was again, it’s the industry standard resolution for video. And a very nice small form factor, so it wasn’t overly intimidating, there wasn’t a whole pile of buttons they had to kind of get into. So it wasn’t like looking at a pilot’s cockpit, where you’re just like, there’s buttons galore, blah, blah, blah, blah. And like the big factor is like, even with these cameras, is like yeah, there’s a lot of buttons and a lot of functions, but once you realize what you’re working with, you realize that you probably only use five of those buttons on any given shoot. So it’s far less intimidating when you realize a lot of those buttons are kind of like secondary or even further down the line in terms of when you actually have to ever use them. So, yeah, the Canon range of entry level cameras, the Rebel bodies, so there’s the Canon Rebel T6i or T7i, I believe there is now, that’s a great entry point. Get yourself a couple lenses, it usually comes to the kit lens, that comes in the box, that’s gonna be particularly good for your wide angle option. If you wanna decent, actually better than decent, pretty darn good, for the money portrait lens, which is gonna be ideal for getting portrait shots of people close, medium shots close ups of people, that look really good and really soften out your background so it’s nice and blurry, you’re gonna wanna look at the Canon 50 millimeter f/1.8. So if you look, Google that lens.The Nifty Fifty.The Nifty Fifty, it’s calledbecause it’s just a cheap, easy lens. The construction and the build quality isn’t too fancy at all. But what it gives you is a pretty cool image for the price, it’s probably about 160, $170, which is nothing. I think that’s probably the cheapest brand new lens you can buy. And but the results that gives you, particularly starting out are unbelievable for getting a nice isolated shot of an individual or a product or an item on camera. So look into that, that’s definitely the number two lens you wanna be buying when you’re starting out with these digital SLR camera bodies.Yeah, and to that point, specifically when,both personal and business side of things, I use the kit lens and the Nifty Fifty specifically for that. The Nifty Fifty being great for interviews, being great for getting that nice depth of field, pulling focus and whatnot. Whereas with the kit lens, what you get with that, ’cause with the Fifty, you have that fixed focal length, so you don’t get that much flexibility,You have to move.You literally have to move, exactly.You don’t have the zoom function on the lens.Exactly whereas with the kit lens,you did get the the ability of shooting a bit wider.Yeah.Obviously with it being 18 to 55,Means you can go from a wide to a portrait.Exactly, but there are the cons of that being that,the f-stop on that was much higher, so just, it gives you less room to work with, or made things more challenging if you really wanted to get that washed out background that you’d get with the with the Nifty Fifty.Yeah.So they both, from jumping from beginner to intermediate,I feel those two are a good combo to start with, and then obviously, as we kind of prefix this whole episode with is like obviously, as you learn more, you can build on it right. And I think those would be a good starting point, with any DSLR.
Yeah.I think that’s a great starting point for your cameras. Yeah, again, one quick tip to look up, is go on to YouTube and look up the exposure triangle. So you can understand more about the aperture and what it does in terms of softening your background of your image, and letting light into the camera. But also tells you, ’cause it is a triangle that’s aperture, shutter speed, and ISO, which is fake, no.Fake game.Light.Being brought into the image through the sensor, once you understand those three principles, you will really start to understand how these cameras function, and you’ll feel that much more comfortable.They definitely all complement each other.Yeah, and understanding how to use themmakes it a lot more sense at the end of the day. So look that up, exposure triangle.Yeah, ’cause even shutter speed,if you wanna really go for that, film kind of location at 24 frames per second, making sure that your shutter speed’s not cranked, because your ISO, is so low, if you have an understanding of those three.Yeah.You will see why these three all complement each other.And if you know all three, and have them at their ideal settings, you will get that cinematic looking quality footage out of this–$800 camera.I was gonna say $1,000 camera.Yeah.So yeah, so that is your camera with lenses,just you know, just touching on that. Now, before we jump into audio, the one thing with DSLR is I’d say that it’s kind of a con, is the whole handheld, you gotta get good. There are techniques to shoot handheld, while keeping your footage stable, that’s just something that just will take practice. More points of contact obviously means the stable, the more stable the camera is. Because when you have it in your hand, you’re holding the lens, and then you know, just working your body, but in the reality of like, the Osmo Pocket, with the gimbal or even from the GoPro or even some of the more recent mobile phones that have built in stabilize software, you’re not gonna get that, and you definitely don’t wanna shoot handheld with the Nifty Fifty because–It’s gonna be shaky, shaky footage.It’s super shaky, and looking at gimbals or stabilizersfor the DSLR, that’s where a price point start jumping,Really starts to jump up.Yeah, so there are the pros and cons there.So again, it really comes down to what you’re trying to achieve, what kind of shot style, all these things do come into play when you are producing a video. So that being said, let’s jump into audio. We talked about the wired lav for the mobile devices and whatnot.What’s the next step.Now what is the next step upgiven that we’re shooting with DSLRs?So a fairly standard price point of anywhere from,probably around 300 to about $600, you can get yourself a very good wireless lavalier mic. Again and we touched on this earlier, with the phone is that the lavalier lapel mic like, what we’re wearing right, now clips onto your shirt or you can tape it inside the shirt, goes around chest level, it’s gonna be one of your best options for getting really clean audio from a subject. So we in house, we use the Sennheiser brand of wireless lavalier mics. It’s kind of the, one of the industry standard models of wireless lav mics is a Sennheiser G3 audio pack. It’s now been discontinued, but and replaced now with the G4. So if you look that up, I believe it’s just under $600 for one mic pack kit. And you cannot go wrong with this microphone. Again, it’s just really good quality audio for the money. Yes, $600 sounds like a lot, but again, as I’m mentioned earlier, people are more willing to be okay with a lesser looking shot. They’re not gonna be as forgiving if your audio is a little, is pretty rubbish. So have good audio. So this will give you nice sounding quality audio.Yeah.For a little bit less you can probably geta different brand of wireless audio microphone, but I just like this one, so for $600 it’s totally worth the cash.So you’re saying, so, yeah, the wireless lapel mic,obviously, is probably the best way to go. ‘Cause there’s a lot more flexibility to it because it’s as close as you can get the microphone to your subject, and also gives you the flexibility of how far away you are from your subject.Getting untethered from the cameras is a nice feeling,You can literally have your subjectstanding on a balcony 100 feet away, maybe not 100 feet.Depending on the range of the mic, somewhere in there50 feet, and be–
You get what I meanby having your subject be, have a significant distance away from the camera, yet still, the quality of audio is the exact same as clear and the exact same as if there were only five feet away. Now in the instance of, maybe not going the wireless approach, there are directional mics that obviously help with focusing whatever direction you point the microphone at, that’s where I’ll focus the input of where that audio’s coming from, and not pick up so much of the background noise. So in this situation, I like being at a convention, something like that, that’s a little bit more directional is ideal, but in the situation you’d be shooting on a convention or at a convention or on a convention floor, you’re gonna have all those buzzing people behind. So even though that’s directional, you’re gonna pick up that noise, but a pro, I’d say with a directional mic, is if you’re recording say in a room that has like hums and ambient noise events and ceiling fans and stuff, you can have the microphone pointing down, having a little bit above your subject pointing down and recording that way.So we’re talking about shotgun microphones.Shotgun microphones, yes.Or similar as microphones–Both video mics that are in similar fashion.They’re still kind of like shotgun shotgun.Yeah, I don’t know if they’re technically a shotgun mic.I think they are,because they still have the tube, that cylinder shape. So the cylinder shape, often in shotgun microphones, often is indicative of a fairly directional microphone. So fairly targeted point, which is what you’re saying, like it’s wherever you point, the end of that cylinder, where the microphone lives is gonna be firing and looking to pick up audio from, so it’s gonna be really good at kind of isolating the rest of those sounds and getting all those sounds out of there. So like you said, if you point that, if you have the above your subject and pointing down at their head, that kind of thing, right in front of right at their chest kind of area, probably you can be like three feet above their head, kind of thing or two feet above their head, like you said, getting rid of the ventilation sounds above them and things like that. So it’s a really good secondary option to level their mics.Yep, and then also,I’m just going off experience here too, just in regards of not using a wireless kit in a situation of using even the Rode VideoMic, and running an auxiliary cable from it, it would require additional accessories being a mic stand.Yeah.But you could also have it mounted on a mic stand, and then you have an auxiliary cable running into the camera. That means you have to go out and get that mic stand, and then you also have to get that auxiliary cable that’s long enough, they come in varying lengths.All of which is cheaper.It is cheaper, and but again,so cheaper obviously being a pro there, but.Not as mobile and portable.Exactly, and exactly.I think you nailed that one right on the head there, is that it’s not as flexible and portable.You don’t have to be taking this microphone stand,with this long cord running to your camera, when you’re on like a convention floor so that if your business.Exactly.Yeah, if you’re outside,it’s not as realistic to be using that setup.So that’s audio, or microphones, I should sayat kind of the intermediate level. And so, now let’s dive into I guess, to kind of follow, again, to follow the same thing of the beginner level. We talked about stabilizing and tripods.Yes.What would you say is an intermediate level tripod,in comparison to a beginner?Yeah, so we touched on the beginner levelsbeing like the GorillaPod, or like an Amazon Basics tripod, those are like very kind of straightforward, not getting a lot of features, things like that, and those but they do the job. If you’re looking for something a little bit better, that has definitely a lot of run room, so you can have it for several years and be really happy with it, we use these tripods at this level at work, or the particularly if I had to name a brand Manfrotto. Manfrotto is a brand of tripod, and video tripod specifically is what you want. So it costs us per tripod around 400 to $500 for a tripod. But the video tripods are awesome. And particularly if you’re shooting video, you want a video tripod ideally, because what that means is that within the head of the tripod, which is what you mount your camera to, that the video head has fluid motion built into it. So it has dampening features in the tilt, which is your up and down and your pan which is left to right or right to left. So both of those functions have a dampening system in there that they’re not gonna be, if you use just a basic tripod, they don’t have fluid head motion to them. So that what that means is that if you’re doing like a pan, even if you have a micro stop in terms of moving your hands as you’re panning left to right, for example, you’re gonna see it back in your video footage, when you review the shot, that there’s like little stopping moments, and things like, that you didn’t even realize that you’re doing, it’s more abrupt too, whereas with these video heads, it dampens the beginning and it dampens the end, and it’s soft throughout, so it’s just smoother, which is ideally what you want particularly ’cause you’re shooting video. Those cheaper tripods are great for a starting point, or particularly if you’re shooting photos because you’re not doing a pan while you’re taking a photo, it doesn’t work like that. So yeah, that’s something to definitely look at investing. For 500 bucks for a fairly sturdy tripod, it’s worth the money.Yeah, so you get the the video side of things.Of the line, the panning and tilting and whatnot. But now at the same time, durability.Yeah, durability is obviously a big jump up,from going from a $50 tripod, obviously to a four or $500 tripod. They’re built a lot better. Yeah, they’ll last you a long time.Yeah, so , yeah, that’s tripods,the whole stabilization aspect of things, let’s not really dive into that. Like, I think the Osmo Pocket.Still valid at this price point.At this point yeah, exactly.There are sliders out there that do achieve that kind of subtle motion, if you do wanna add.Cinema motion.Yeah, dolly in and out, or go on side to side.Those are the fun stuff that comes later on,once you get your feet wet and try some stuff.Exactly, so then I guess the last thingwhich we didn’t touch on on the beginner level, because at the beginner level, I think it’s just.Getting used to the functions.Yeah, but now lastly in, but the thing is,even at the beginning of this, what we’re gonna talk about still trickles down to that, like it’s same principles and whatnot. But I just don’t think at the beginner level, this is something you should really worry about, which is lighting.Yeah.So, at the intermediate level, you’re working with DSLRs,and whatnot, and you wanna make sure that you’re, capitalizing at the functions that it offers and what–Quality overall.Yes, given that, what do you think,would be the best situation from a lightning perspective?Sure, so there’s a couple,there’s kind of two different ways you can go with lighting. So lighting isn’t just turning on lights full blown bright, and blasting it into your scene, whether it’s just like a wide open space, or on a piece of product or a person, it’s not just like lights on 100% and where you go, lights are used to shape your scene, and give tonality and shape and contour to your subject. So I would highly encourage anybody listening or watching to YouTube three point lighting, for video, that will give you a very good starting point, for getting better quality lighting, particularly for doing interviews and things like that, for getting somebody on camera. Three lights, and or even two lights with a large reflector can go a long way. It makes the world of difference in terms of pulling your subject or your main point of focus, off of a background. So the background is often kind of like the cherry on top. the background isn’t always the most important thing in the frame, obviously. So it’s just there to kind of be pretty, sometimes, a little bit.It accents.It accents, right.Establishes the settings.Yeah, so why would you wantto not have lights, for example, or to blend your subject, your main subject, your foreground in with your background, you would never, of course, that sounds obvious, you wouldn’t wanna do that. We’ll use lights to pull, to cause that depth to happen even more. So in a three point lighting setup, you have your key light, which is your main light source. On one side of your subject, then you have your fill light, which is a softer light, a little bit more dampened and subdued, on the other sides just, lessen the dark shadows on the other side of the subject. And then you have your hair lighter, your backlight, which contours layer around the edge of their body, to pull them off of the background a little bit more. That’s the basics of it, but YouTube it three point lighting. At the end of the day, I’ve used all kinds of different lighting kits from expensive ones, to really cheap ones. On the really cheap side, if you’re looking to just gonna get a starting point with lighting, you can go on Amazon, you can get a three point lighting kit, if you just type that in, lots will come up. And they’re pretty basic light kits, they only have a few light switches for just like a couple switches for on and then a couple switches for off. So you don’t have a lot of control in terms of like what we have now, which is dials from, go from 0% to 100% in terms of light intensity, but it’s a good starting point. So these lights will probably cost you around 100 to $200, for the full kit. Oftentimes on Amazon too, you’ll notice that you get like three lights with stands and a backdrop that has stands. So you get like a green screen backdrop, so you can try the grand world of green screen and like you’re a weather person or something. You can do a lot of cool stuff with the green screen. But it gives you a good starting point anyway. So for 200 bucks, it’s not a bad option, we have lights that are a little bit more sophisticated than that. We invested in a brand of lights from Ikan, I-K-A-N. And it’s a three point lighting kit. And they are LED panels, and what they allow us to do when they’re cool running, so they don’t output any heat into the space. So that’s a nice feature, obviously, they’re really efficient, obviously, and they last a long time. But they also have bi-color, a bi-color dial on them. So you can mix in your color temperatures of your lighting within your scenes. So your color can run anywhere from orange, yellowy tungsten light, to really bluey white light, which is more like outdoor lighting. So the ability to dial that in specifically based on your lighting scenario and match that is crucial. Or go vastly against it and adding colored gels in front of your lights and things like that is another feature as well. But these lights do a great job for that. And these are about $2,000 for the three point lighting kit.So that being said, talking about color temperatures,and having a more of a yellowish hue versus a bluish hue, and this even comes back to the camera side of things. And what the DSLRs and even at the professional level, they have the functions to help balance these color temperatures which is called white balancing. Maybe let’s kind of touch on the importance of why these lights have the ability to change color temperatures. (Matt speaking quietly) And when you wouldn’t, and why you probably wouldn’t wanna, have, say, house lights on that are, say, add a more warmish hue and then have a light get set up that are–Whity blue.Exactly.So obviously the ideal scenariofor a standard basic interview is that whatever house lights you have, so house lights are like lights that are in the ceiling or coming down from the ceiling. Maybe you don’t have the ability to turn them off, or it’s gonna be really dark in the open space, say, at your business, and it’s gonna look silly. So what you wanna do is obviously keep those on, but then you have to make sure that your lights are of a matching color. So color temperature. So often, indoor lights in a business are often tungsten. So they follow that, on the color temperature ranges meant that ranges measured in Kelvin. So kind of the standard spectrum, they’re probably around 32, 3600 Kelvin is the color of that yellowy orange look of like a tungsten bulb inside a building. Versus if you go outside, it’s somewhere around the 5,000, 6,000 Kelvin mark.That’s like day light, natural light.Yeah, daylight natural light is that crisp,white blue light that we kind of see outside. So you’ve obviously in a standard kind of interview setup or standard production, you wanna match those lights to the house lights. If you polarize them and go the opposite way, so if I used bluey white lights that mixed with the inside business lights that are yellow, you’re gonna cause either greening of your individual skin tones, are causing them to go purply, depending on like the which way the lights are flipped or flopped, that’s if you’re not matching them, you’re gonna get that weird color balance. And why that is is because your camera also needs to balance its coloring on the sensor. So the sensor needs to white balance itself, essentially, to make sure that your whites are coming out true white and not really orangey, brown, or really bluey, or really greeny or purpley or whatever. At mix, like that’s a major factor. So again, that’s another thing to YouTube is white balance within video. But once you properly balance that, that’s like a big factor.That explains why,like on depending the level of DSLR, like on the more lower end, you’ll see the white balance settings where it’s daylight, tungsten, fluorescent,Or the white balance.Or white balance can also be a fairly usable option, as long as your lighting in your space isn’t changing. So in our office where we work, it’s a fairly mixed lighting environment. So we have a lot of windows, and it can go from sunny outside to very cloudy and start raining, which changes the color of the light coming into our space from outside, even though it’s dark, it’s still spilling in light, ’cause the sun’s still piercing through even a little bit. And then that changes the white balance mixture between our outside light and our inside light. And you have to constantly be paying attention to what that’s doing and try and balancing that. So that’s a big factor. So white balance is super important, because your camera doesn’t know to…Compensate.Compensate, unless you set it up for auto white balance,which is fairly close. Or you can customize and dial it in directly in the camera. So it’s super made, it’s a major factor, because last thing you want is your person to look like Grimace from McDonalds, or like the Green Goblin or something like that, because he didn’t color balance properly.And so yeah, and as you said,the lighting is a thing of its own because–Go on forever.Exactly, so we’re just scratching the surface on that.And yeah, I think what you said really kind of covers, your bases at least from an overview of a light setup and why it’s important at that intermediate level. And we did take a little bit more time at this level, because this is obviously where you’re gonna start.Yes.And then what you learn,and what you do at this stage will only…Grow from there.Exactly, will bloom into that professional level.That’s right, I think that’s important,because again at any of these stages, like we said at the beginning, it’s really important to know, it’s like what we’re giving you here is like the starting point at that level. And it’s up to you to kind of take it and run with it from there and find out the limitations, because if you’re finding the limits, that means you’re getting better. So if you’re getting better, good for you, then invest in the next tier up and like the bigger and better, quote unquote, stuff.So that being said, we’ll use that as a segueto jump into our next and final level, which would be the professional approach. The professional stance is, what we would consider kind of like, questions that kind of, it’s what we’re at, what we do, we are the in house video team, where we work, we’ve been doing this for.A long time.A long time, I’d say about 10 years now.11 years.There you go.We would put ourselves at this level, and yeah, then so it also comes down to just our knowledge, but at the same time the equipment that we use. So that being said, let’s dive into the camera at a professional level.Sure, so yeah, okay.so you’ve invested in that digital SLR, you’ve kind of reached peak ability with that and you’re looking to invest in something further. A lot of different options within this space, and it’s become more of a blend between consumer and professional and the consumer level products are doing amazing things. There’s a lot of mirrors cameras, for example, mirrorless, still cameras that shoot amazing 4k video with really good color compression, or lack of color compression, which is great, ’cause you can color correct your footage a lot better in post production. So it starts to really blur the lines. But if you’re looking at getting a proper, like video camera, primarily video camera we use in house, we use a Sony FS5 camera, there’s also the FS7, which is the big brother, that one. There’s also some models from Canon that are the Canon C100, 200, 300. And yeah there’s a few others in the mix there as well. Yeah, there’s but we use the Sony FS5. So this camera is built to be a video camera, which means that it has two SD card slots that record until they fill up. So and a lot of the consumer level video cameras. So at the $800 mark, like we mentioned from Canon, it’s recording for a half hour and commit and then it’ll stop recording. So then you have to hit record again, it’s you can look into it, looking at why it’s doing that. Because it’s a stills camera primarily and has this video function, so they had to limit that ability for, I think export and trade reasons, it was kind of a funny thing. But either way, in our camera, we can record until the card fills up. It also has full on professional audio interfaces. So we’re working with not little small auxiliary sized 1/8 headphone jack style plugs to plug in or audio sources. Now we’re working with XLR plugs, which are larger three pronged inputs that are a lot more sturdy, a lot more robust, a better cleaner, audio signal for our audio sources. So that’s a big factor, not only that, the color compression.
Two inputs.Also has two inputs, which is great.The color compression is better, there’s a lot more buttons on this thing, which when you start to get used to all of the functions and the buttons, having access. (Blake speaking quietly) Yes, yeas, and then once you become more of a professional pilot, you search access more of those buttons, and more of those toggles. So the same thing happens on a camera like this, a lot of those buttons become a lot more useful to you because you start to realize what they do for you. So that’s a major factor. But another really great thing on this camera, is that it is an interchangeable lens camera, which means that we could take the lens off, and put different ones on that do specific things, wider, tighter, different little funky features. But behind that lens attached to the camera, is a dial that is a neutral density filter. And that’s effectively sunglasses for your, that goes in front of your sensor. So the reason why that’s important is that, again, if you research the exposure triangle, this will make a lot more sense. But if you’re at an more open aperture in your lens, that means that there’s more the iris, it’s effectively, it’s the same thing with your eye, when your iris opens in your eye, the pupil gets larger, which means that more light is coming into your eye. The same thing, the same element lives within the lens, as that aperture opens up, more light is allowed to come in through the lens and hit the sensor. So the byproduct of that as well is that, you have a softer depth of field, which is what we’re talking about, that buttery soft background, which takes your foreground and separates it from the background more. If you close that aperture, less light comes into and through the lens and hits the sensor. And that also means that, you have a shallower depth of field. The science behind that, if you look it up, but it’s kind of complicated, but effectively what it means is that you have a shallower depth of field, which means that more of your background’s in focus. Why would you care about having sunglasses on your sensor? Well say you’re outside and the most obvious example, say, you’re outside, it’s a sunny day, you wanna open up the aperture really wide so that you’re getting a lot of light in, but primarily you’re also doing that so that you have a really soft depth of field and shallow depth of field so that your background is nice and buttery smooth. So that your person that you’re, for example, interviewing stands off in the background, pretty substantially. What you need to do to make up for that overexposure, now that you’ve opened up that aperture is darken your shot. And one way to do that is to use a neutral density filter which darkens your shot, it’s sunglasses at different steps, it gets darker and darker. So the fact that that’s built into our camera, as opposed to us having to put on filters, they’re called, on the front of the lens and have different sizes, for different sizes of lens is a big factor, it’s a big pain in the butt to have to screw them on and unscrew them and put on different ones, depending on the thing. This is built right in, and in fact it’s even electronic. So it’s one neutral density filter that drops in front, and it sends electrical signals through that piece of glass to darken and brighten up that piece of glass.It has three levels.Yeah, or you can just use the one,and then use that electrical signal to run through it. so that’s pretty unbelievable technology. And so this little camera for example, comes in and around five, $6,000. But again, also this camera of course shoots at 4k at this price point, which we use here and there.Various frame rates.Various frame rates.Yeah, so it’s just a much more versatile option, and much more video-friendly camera. But again, you probably don’t wanna be investing in this camera necessarily unless you have oodles of money and oodles of time to learn about it when you’re starting out.And know exactly what you’re doing with the camera.Yeah, otherwise it’ll be very intimidating,you’re probably gonna mess up some stuff.Exactly.Yeah, so that’s on the camera.That was a lot, I know it was a lot.So I try not to scare people, but it’s really important to know, why it makes a difference.Now when it comes to audio, I think like,because we talked about using the Sennheiser wireless kits and whatnot at the intermediate level, and using the Rode VideoMics, which are directional shotgun mics. What can you add about the microphones, because these wireless kits are pretty much I would say professional level.They’re 100% professional level microphones,yet still, they still count.What can you say that would differentiate, say,using microphones and audio at an intermediate level to professional?Like, what’s another piece of equipment you can add?Or a piece of equipment or just from a knowledge thing,’cause like, one thing that I would say is one, a lot of people will rely on automatic,Right for the audio levels and things like that.‘Cause a lot of DSLRs, you don’t have the abilityto see your audio levels while recording and being able to adjust those levels.That’s a huge, yeah, I know what you’re saying.Yeah, I get what you’re saying. Yeah so obviously, with this video camera as well, when you plug in any audio source, you have full manual control, if you want, which typically you do, over the the audio channels coming in. So this has two XLR inputs, which means that we can plug in two XLR sources. So Blake has a microphone on him, I have a microphone on me. And we can customize the levels, the audio levels based off of our voice and tone separately, independently of each other, and change them on the fly if we realized partway through that one of us actually gets louder than the other and we can dial those back. Huge factor to be able to just do that, and get a readout on the display of the camera while you’re shooting. On a lot of the entry level cameras, in particular, they don’t give you those options or don’t make them nearly as easy to access and change on the fly.Yeah, ’cause you’d have to,Turn on the menu.Yeah, like with the 5D Mark III, which we have.I know, ’cause what do they have now? Is it the Mark IV?I think they’re the Mark IV, yeah.So I personally haven’t used the Mark IV.,but with the Mark III, you do have the ability to adjust the audio on the fly.But it’s together, it’s stereo.Yeah and it’s yeah, exactly.And it’s just the one–It’s one audio source.One audio source.Whereas, the lower level ones, with the Rebels and whatnot. And now we’re just speaking from experience, specifically ’cause we mostly use Canon. But, with the lower level, you’d have to stop recording go into your menu, and then you check your record. Exactly, you had to check your recording level and see how it’s bouncing around in there.Which is kind of a pain.It is a painbecause you just have to make sure what you’re recording is what you want, and then or what you’re hearing was what you want. And then you go in back into your preview, and then start recording.Yeah.Is there anything else you thinkfrom an audio perspective, in regards to audio recording. Do you wanna maybe touch on what we use? Our actual Rode.Yeah, so we have a Rode NTG2, I believe,whichever one is the more expensive. There’s NTG2, there’s NTG3, whichever one, if you look up as the more slightly expensive one, it sounds funny to say that, but it’s true. This microphone is very, very good for the money, it’s I think it’s around seven, $800. But for the money, it’s unbelievable. And so a shotgun microphone is typically a tube-shaped microphone, it’s often very directional. This one’s very directional, and it’s perfect for a lot of our larger scale productions at work, or we have a studio at work, so we can set it up on a boom pole, and then have that use that in a controlled environment. It gives really good results, and then we also don’t have to put a microphone on somebody. Sometimes the downside to a microphone, depending on who you have on camera, is depending on what they have in terms of material of their clothing, it can cause a lot of rustling. So if you don’t wanna show the microphone, and typically on a lot of our productions, we don’t wanna see the lapel microphone, you try and hide it. So then we tape it on the inside, work around ways, often we can get away with doing that. But sometimes depending on like the quality of the material that somebody is wearing, you can get rustling and scratching, which just you ruin the audio then so you can’t use that. So knowing that we can just bypass that all together and just use a really high quality audio source that really makes people sound very good. With that using that shotgun microphone, it’s a great option. If you have the time to set up that kind of thing, it’s worth the money to do so. But it’s far less mobile, so you don’t wanna be going to a conference or something like that, where you’re sitting up the shotgun microphone, because you have a stand and you have an arm and then you have the microphone pointing down. It kinda takes up some space. It’s a tripping hazard, so it’s more for a controlled environment production.Yeah, so we talked about tripod,at the beginner and intermediate level. Do you think there’s much difference from, say, it was Manfrottos that we’re talking about at the intermediate level, now jumping up to the professional.Yeah.Do you have any added commentary therefrom intermediate to a professional level tripod?OConnor’s and more professional grade, Manfrottos,and there’s tons of other brands, at the more professional level, but you’re looking at like 2000, three, four, $5,000, whatever plus, not as necessary for if you’re doing video inside, like a business, for example, at the professional level. It’s nice to have those if your budget allows for that. But you can still get away with anywhere from like a five to $1,000 tripod.Yeah.And have it be pretty good.Certainly, if you’re spending $5,000 on a tripod, you’re gonna notice the difference between that and a $500 one, in terms of the fluidity and the rigidity and the quality of the tripod. But then you got to figure out if that’s worth the $4500 price difference for your business, and whether that’s where you wanna spend that money. You can get a lot of other stuff for that money, or just that tripod. So it depends on your budget, but there is a difference.Yeah, okay so then lastly, at the professional level,is the lighting situation.Yes.What would you say is the leap from an intermediate levellight set up, to a professional light setup?So yeah you’re gonna be looking at things like,larger and more focused for now lights. Fresnel lights are often like hot running lights, which is more ideal in a larger space. Not ideal in a tight studio, like what’s at our office. So again, like I mentioned before, we use these LED power LED light banks that work really well. They have a challenge though, if you have somebody, say, you interview somebody, and they have they have a window behind them, and you’re competing with the outside light, it’s gonna cause lots of shadows on their face. So you have to have strong enough lights to expose your individual and make them bright enough, and then level out the outside light ’cause the outside light is very strong light coming into a scene, particularly for the camera to balance out. So you’d be looking at lights that are obviously more costly, like Kino Flos, are a big name, ARRI Lights are some more lights, Kino Flos are very industry standard for still within the relative budget that you’re looking at spending without it being too crazy. But those, like a three point lighting kit from Kino Flo is probably gonna run you anywhere around $5,000, $7,000, depending on what kind you get and the size. So where I worked previously we had a Kino Flo set that was, they were four feet tall, and they had four bulbs across. So he had these long, two bulbs. And what you could also do is that you had daylight bulbs and you had tungsten bulb, so you’d switch them out from daylight white, bluey tone to orangey, yellowy tungsten bulbs. But you could also add in, ’cause there were so big, you add in these large gels color gels to change the color of the light to balance out.Yeah.A lot more cumbersome, a lot more heavy,you need a lot more space to set them up. So what we have here is still pretty versatile and lightweight, but if you need something to compete against stronger light sources in your space, you need to invest in those higher quality lights.Yeah, and those lights too are more for likewhen you’re like on a set and whatnot, and you really need to fill the space to really, because with even within our studio, like using these lights, we have to use more of them if we really want a kind of flat note.Yeah, if we wanna try and get like a white background,like a crisp white across background with no shadows, or any color really, you need, we could really use bigger lights than what even we have to necessarily get that even tone, color tone, or hue across our backdrop. You just need larger lights to that. So they’re called four foot four bank lights, a couple of those, and maybe a third one, depending on whatever your setup is does a really nice job of kind of evening out your background town, or again, lighting your subjective if they’re against a bright backdrop. So yeah, that’s the pro side of things. That’s when you really know what you’re doing, though.Yeah.So, yeah, so I think that pretty much covers everything,This is a taste though, this is just like a down.From a camera side of things,you can even jump up another level, but we’re not even gonna talk about that because like–That’s Cinema Camera.That’s exactly, like we were talking reds,is it air-ee or are-ee (ARRI)?
I say air-ee.Regardless, we’re talking about those typeof cinematic level cameras that you’re looking at an arm and a leg to, that’s just for the body itself. And then you gotta talk about, the lenses and the rigs that you, media, the solid states that are driving, so many pieces to actually to even start recording. So we’re not even gonna dive into that, because we don’t need that, I don’t think you guys would need that.And if you do, then you already knowwhat you’re talking about.And if you do need to look at, something at that quality,which we have done, that’s where you reach out to, production company, who can help you achieve that level of production. But like I said, like we said, to be at that point of production, you’re gonna actually need an entire team because the camera is not gonna be doing the work by itself. The camera will not be recording audio, you’ll need an audio engineer to recording that, you’ll need somebody to be running the lights.It’s a bigger crew, bigger setup.So, with all that said and done,I think that pretty much covers our basis from intermediate or sorry, beginner to intermediate to professional, in regards to not only the hardware, but just from knowledge and experience in the world of video production. And, and as I said at the beginning of this, they the two, are parallel, they run together because, again, you’re not gonna be a beginner and invest the money and time and effort into the top tier professional level hardware when you have no idea how it works. So your best bet is to gauge where you sit, whether you’re a beginner, an intermediate, or if you’re a professional. Find out where you are just gauge what you think your level is of knowledge when it comes to video production and start there and work with what you have.Do some research, YouTube can be your best friend,and can teach you a whole heck of a lot.Yeah.You’re a beginner, work with your iPhone, or go out and use your friends with GoPro or something like that, and work with it until you hit that–
That limit.That limit of, oh, I wanna achieve this look,but I can’t do it with this. And if you’ve hit that point, and I think–Time to jump up, you graduated.Exactly, you’ve earned that level or that point of,jumping or crossing the bridge to to the next level.And same thing for the next tier up, same idea,you’ll hit that limit, and then it’s time to jump over there.And a lot of this is very subjective, like,how you wanna achieve your, it all comes down to your style, the creative and what you’re trying to do. There’s so many different styles of videos out there, whether it’s from business or personal, whatever it be. Sometimes you’re making a video and it doesn’t even require a camera. But we’ll save that for another day.What?!
(both laughing)
So, yeah, so I think that pretty much covers itin regards to being beginner, intermediate, professional, and pretty much what equipment is worth your time.Yeah, hope that helps.
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